Sneak Preview of Victorian Speed!

VictorianSpeedBanner2On the evening of Thursday 18th October, the Museum of the History of Science will be throwing open its doors for a special event – Victorian Speed: The Long History of Fast Living. Enter an entertaining world of games, interactive exhibits, and short talks as our own Diseases of Modern Life researchers introduce you to the new technologies and sometimes bizarre medical treatments of the Victorian age.

This is a free, ticketed drop-in event. There are two time slots for the event to help reduce crowding. These run 6-7.30pm or 7.30-9pm. We recommend you pre-book ticket. It may be possible to turn up on the night if space allows. Book your place here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/victorian-speed-the-long-history-of-fast-living-registration-49259062181 and join in the anticipation on our Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/341302476615098/

Below are tasters of the activities that await!

Timing the Victorians, with Dr. Hosanna Krienke: Victorians thought their world had sped up, but how fast were they going? This trivia game introduces Victorian timescales: both the shockingly fast and the surprisingly slow.

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Apparatus for Stimulating Nerves. Credit: Wellcome Collection CC BY

Emergency! with Dr. Sally Frampton: With industrialisation, new technologies and a rapid pace of life came accidents. Lots of them. Try your hand at first aid trivia. In this game, you will encounter strange methods of first-aid. Your task will be to sort out fact from fiction, as well as historical techniques from today’s best methods.

Death and Disease Behind the Counter, with Dr. Alison Moulds: Long hours and living-in meant that Victorian retail work was associated with ill-health and exhaustion; come explore the parallels between the plight of shop assistants then and now and share your own horror stories of working on the shop floor.

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Credit: Wellcome Collection CC BY

Telegraphic Tempo: High-Speed Communication in the 19th Century?, with Dr. Jean-Michel Johnston: The Victorians believed the electric telegraph would transform their lives–for better and for worse. Instant messaging could bring the world closer together, but would it also unnecessarily accelerate life? Discover the reality of high-speed communication in the nineteenth century by trying out some telegraphic tweeting!

Digesting the Modern World, with Dr. Emilie Taylor-Brown: Vegan, vegetarian, low carb, no dairy, sugar-free, paleo, clean eating, and the 5:2… we live in a world obsessed with diet, but we have the Victorians to thank for our interest in digestion. From how long it took to digest a meal, to what time one should eat supper, to when to use the loo…come and learn about how the Victorians experienced “gastric time”!

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Reconstruction of Alexis St. Martin, Medical Museion, Copenhagen. Credit: Dr. Emilie Taylor-Brown

The Slow Road to Nowhere: Victorian Sexual Diseases Tombola, with Dr. Sarah Green: So your fast modern living has landed you with some worrying symptoms down below – what are your options? Enter the surprisingly slow, tedious and painful world of Victorian VD treatment with our sexual health tombola.

There will also be a photo booth provided by the wonderful Decadent Times (https://www.decadenttimes.com/photobooth), so that you can share your new-found historical look as swiftly as social media allows you to! #VictorianSpeed

And don’t forget to use your map to find objects related to the different activities placed around the museum!

If you would like to be added to the Museum of the History of Science’s mailing list, please visit http://www.mhs.ox.ac.uk/join/e-newsletter/

We look forward to welcoming you to Victorian Speed – in full period dress, no less!

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The Museum of the History of Science’s Education Officer in Victorian garb
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