Sneak Preview of Victorian Speed!

VictorianSpeedBanner2On the evening of Thursday 18th October, the Museum of the History of Science will be throwing open its doors for a special event – Victorian Speed: The Long History of Fast Living. Enter an entertaining world of games, interactive exhibits, and short talks as our own Diseases of Modern Life researchers introduce you to the new technologies and sometimes bizarre medical treatments of the Victorian age.

This is a free, ticketed drop-in event. There are two time slots for the event to help reduce crowding. These run 6-7.30pm or 7.30-9pm. We recommend you pre-book ticket. It may be possible to turn up on the night if space allows. Book your place here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/victorian-speed-the-long-history-of-fast-living-registration-49259062181 and join in the anticipation on our Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/341302476615098/

Below are tasters of the activities that await!

Timing the Victorians, with Dr. Hosanna Krienke: Victorians thought their world had sped up, but how fast were they going? This trivia game introduces Victorian timescales: both the shockingly fast and the surprisingly slow.

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Apparatus for Stimulating Nerves. Credit: Wellcome Collection CC BY

Emergency! with Dr. Sally Frampton: With industrialisation, new technologies and a rapid pace of life came accidents. Lots of them. Try your hand at first aid trivia. In this game, you will encounter strange methods of first-aid. Your task will be to sort out fact from fiction, as well as historical techniques from today’s best methods.

Death and Disease Behind the Counter, with Dr. Alison Moulds: Long hours and living-in meant that Victorian retail work was associated with ill-health and exhaustion; come explore the parallels between the plight of shop assistants then and now and share your own horror stories of working on the shop floor.

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Credit: Wellcome Collection CC BY

Telegraphic Tempo: High-Speed Communication in the 19th Century?, with Dr. Jean-Michel Johnston: The Victorians believed the electric telegraph would transform their lives–for better and for worse. Instant messaging could bring the world closer together, but would it also unnecessarily accelerate life? Discover the reality of high-speed communication in the nineteenth century by trying out some telegraphic tweeting!

Digesting the Modern World, with Dr. Emilie Taylor-Brown: Vegan, vegetarian, low carb, no dairy, sugar-free, paleo, clean eating, and the 5:2… we live in a world obsessed with diet, but we have the Victorians to thank for our interest in digestion. From how long it took to digest a meal, to what time one should eat supper, to when to use the loo…come and learn about how the Victorians experienced “gastric time”!

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Reconstruction of Alexis St. Martin, Medical Museion, Copenhagen. Credit: Dr. Emilie Taylor-Brown

The Slow Road to Nowhere: Victorian Sexual Diseases Tombola, with Dr. Sarah Green: So your fast modern living has landed you with some worrying symptoms down below – what are your options? Enter the surprisingly slow, tedious and painful world of Victorian VD treatment with our sexual health tombola.

There will also be a photo booth provided by the wonderful Decadent Times (https://www.decadenttimes.com/photobooth), so that you can share your new-found historical look as swiftly as social media allows you to! #VictorianSpeed

And don’t forget to use your map to find objects related to the different activities placed around the museum!

If you would like to be added to the Museum of the History of Science’s mailing list, please visit http://www.mhs.ox.ac.uk/join/e-newsletter/

We look forward to welcoming you to Victorian Speed – in full period dress, no less!

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The Museum of the History of Science’s Education Officer in Victorian garb
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Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century Seminars in Michaelmas Term 2018

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Tuesday 23 October 2018 (Week 3)

 Dr Lauren Weiss and Prof Kirstie Blair, University of Strathclyde

 Science and the Mutual Improvement Society

Victorian Britain had hundreds, if not thousands, of societies devoted to the cause of self-improvement, many populated by aspiring working-class men (and, later in the century, women). Scientific discussion and debate was very important to these associations. This talk will focus on the little-known archive of their meetings records and the magazines that they produced, showing that these give us significant insight into how, why, and when societies discussed key scientific debates and development, and the ways in which scientific education was perceived as vital to the cause of mutual improvement.

This talk is delivered by Dr Lauren Weiss, whose PhD and postdoctoral research has focused on literary societies and mutual improvement magazines, and Prof Kirstie Blair, whose current research is focused on Scottish and Northern working-class literature and culture.

5.30—7.00, Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

 

Wednesday 7 November 2018 (Week 5)

Dr Imogen Goold, University of Oxford and Dr Catherine Kelly, University of Bristol

Psychiatric Injury and the Hysterical Woman

In this paper, we examine the development of the English courts’ approach to negligently-inflicted psychiatric injury claims from an historical perspective, first tracing the development of the English court’s approach to psychiatric injury claims. We then offer an overview of how mental injury has been understood over the past two centuries, and the notion of the hysterical woman within this framework. We posit the idea that the current law can be best understood as a sympathetic reaction to the notion of the ‘hysterical woman’. We argue that this approach can both explain the early resistance to recognising such claims, but also the enthusiasm for compensation in others. We further argue that the rather confused and conflicting approaches in English law can be understood as a result of the lack of a clearly developed normative basis for compensation. This failure, we suggest, has arisen as a result of the reactive nature of the way in which the law has developed, which has undermined the courts’ development of a more ethically coherent and reasoned approach. We argue that an understanding of the background to the current law can aid in improving the coherency of this area of law in the future.

5.30—7.00, Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

 

Tuesday 20 November 2018 (Week 7)

Dr Megan Coyer, University of Glasgow

Literature and Medicine in the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press: The Literary Doctor in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine

In the early nineteenth century, Edinburgh was the leading centre of medical education and research in Britain. It also laid claim to a thriving periodical culture. This paper explores the relationship between the medical culture of Romantic-era Scotland and the periodical press by examining the work of two key medically-trained contributors to Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, the most influential and innovative literary periodical of the era. I argue that the Romantic periodical press cultivated innovative ideologies, discourses, and literary forms that both reflected and shaped medical culture in the nineteenth century. In the case of Blackwood’s, the magazine’s distinctive Romantic ideology and experimental form enabled the development of an overtly ‘literary’ and humanistic popular medical culture, which participated in a wider critique of liberal Whig ideology in post-Enlightenment Scotland. The construction of the surgeon, sentimental poet, and prolific Blackwoodian contributor, David Macbeth Moir (1798–1851), as a literary surgeon within the magazine is briefly examined. Samuel Warren’s seminal series, Passages from the Diary of a Late Physician (1830–37), is then read in its vexed original publishing context – the ideologically charged popular periodical press – in terms of its inception and reception, as well as its initiation of a new genre of popular medical writing. The paper concludes by reflecting upon the need to further situate the writings and reception of nineteenth-century literary doctors in relation to specific cultural and textual contexts to unpack both the history of medical humanism and the broader relationship between medical and literary cultures during this period.

5.30—7.00, Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

 

Drinks will be served after each seminar. All welcome, no booking required.

Image Credit: Wellcome Collection

Resuscitation, Reanimation and the Modern World

Oct 5

The conference will be held at Maison Française d’Oxford (2-10 Norham Road, OX2 6SE) on Friday 5th October (1pm-6pm) and Saturday 6th October (9.30am-4pm).

The conference seeks to explore the social, cultural, political, and medical aspects of reanimation and resuscitation from the early modern period to the present. From the emergence of societies ‘for the recovery of persons apparently drowned’ across Europe to the setting up of first-aid medical services, the subject of resuscitation has social and medical significance. Changing views about the obligation to save lives may also be indicative of a shift regarding the nature of death and the value of human life, involving both an increasingly secularized conception of the possibility of resurrection (famously explored in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, 1818), and the development of a society characterized by its understanding and management of risk.

‘Resuscitation, Reanimation and the Modern World’ will consider how these phenomena appeared as key concerns of the Enlightenment – initially as miraculous moments, then as displays of medical prowess and manifestations of civic responsibility. The aim of the meeting is to explore how these ideas and practices have developed through time in literary, popular, and medical narratives, as new technologies both ‘medicalised’ resuscitation and extended its practice beyond the medical arena. As a result, we aim to develop new insights, not only into the development and dissemination of medical knowledge but also into broader cultural issues such as citizenship and civic duty, the perception and management of risk, and changing notions of what it means to be human.

More information and the conference programme are available at:

http://www.mfo.cnrs.fr/fr/calendar/resuscitation-reanimation-and-the-modern-world/

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/workshop-resuscitation-reanimation-and-the-modern-world-tickets-50166729037

The conference is free to attend, with all refreshments provided, but please register your attendance via eventbrite (above). The venue is wheelchair accessible.

Resuscitation, Reanimation and the Modern World is organized by Marie Thébaud-Sorger (CNRS/Maison Française d’Oxford) and Jennifer Wallis (Imperial College London). We are grateful for the support of the British Society for the History of Science (BSHS), the Diseases of Modern Life project and the Faculty of History at the University of Oxford, the Maison Française d’Oxford (MFO), the Society for the Social History of Medicine (SSHM), and the Royal Historical Society (RHS).